15 Places to Learn to Code for Free in 2019

There are lots of places where you can learn to code for free. With the boom in using website builders, people are turning to learning code to build and enhance their websites even more. People who know code already, are in a similar profession or are professionals, have been creating resources for many years in order to help others.

If you’ve never looked at web design or web development before, free coding resources can be a great go to, or at least a starting point. Once you’ve got to grips with the basics, you can find more in-depth courses to further your journey. Learning code does take a reasonable amount of time and effort, and you’ve got to want to learn it. Like most things, if you’re not interested, you’re probably going to struggle at the first step.

Who can learn to code?

Anyone can learn to code if they want to. Sometimes it’s worth considering what types of people might benefit more from coding in the long run. Let’s start with a few simple questions to establish if you’re the right person to learn code and make use of our free coding resources.

  • Do you enjoy web development, or the technical theory behind web development?
  • Would you like to be able to turn an application or website idea into something real?
  • Do you write content for a blog and therefore care about the quality and user friendliness of your site?

If you’ve answered yes to any of the above then it’s probably worth you learning code. Although it might seem daunting at first, it can actually be really fun and very rewarding.

You don’t need to be a computer geek to learn how to code. Coding can be done by anyone who has the thirst and desire to learn it. You can make mobile apps, websites and software, no matter who you are! And who knows, you may even turn it into a career or start your very own business.

Why should I learn how to code?

Learning how to code can reduce your overall costs if you are thinking about or currently hire a programmer or developer. In fact, if you become an expert in the field, not only could you save money, you could make money too!

Even if you just learn the basics of coding you could make a big difference to your site or business. Having the bare bone knowledge can often lead to more without even realising it.

Because coding is so popular, the amount of resources available can be overwhelming. That’s why I’ve put together some credible free coding resources for you. I’ll show you where to go (and what for), allowing you to decide the best route for your coding adventure.

Online Courses

1. Codecademy

Codecadmey is like a giant online free coding boot camp. The community at Codecadmey is absolutely massive and is an ideal spot for beginners to jump right in. When you’re learning a new skill, it can often be very useful to have access to a community whereby you can ask questions and discuss ideas. Codecadmey provides this on an extremely large scale with literally millions of users worldwide.

Codecademy is free which is why it’s listed here. Unlike many other companies, you don’t need to have a subscription to learn from Codecademy. One of my favourite features of Codecademy is that you don’t need any kind of software to begin coding. Their easy to use interface is built into their website so everything can be done in your browser.

Codecademy covers the following coding languages:

  • HTML
  • CSS
  • Sass
  • JavaScript
  • Rails
  • Ruby
  • SQL

(And much, much more).

2. Coursera

Coursera offers a large online library of free coding courses. All of the courses available are 100% free which is a great opportunity for anyone wanting to learn coding.

Coursera’s courses aren’t just run by anyone, they’re put together by leading universities and companies in the industry. Although it’s just as valuable to learn new skills from people who use them on a day to day basis, some people find it reassuring when there’s a big name behind the education.

If you want to obtain a Coursera verified certificate to ‘prove’ your coding skills, you’ll need to pay for it. The certificates range from $30+ and can go up to $100. Although this may seem a little steep, if you consider how much it would be to actually go to university of learn from leaders in the industry, it’s very reasonable.

Coursera doesn’t just offer your basic coding languages. They do cover HTML, CSS, JavaScript etc. but they also go far beyond this. There’s specific specialised courses available too (which you do need to pay for).

3. Udemy

Udemy isn’t solely focussed on coding languages but they do offer courses on these. You can access a wide range of in-depth courses through Udemy’s library. Whether you want to improve on existing coding knowledge or learn new skills, Udemy offers it all. From game development to software development, creating apps to testing them, there’s plenty to sink your teeth into.

Courses allow you to learn at your own pace, and will save your ‘history’ so you can come back to it at any point. There are both paid and free courses available, from web development to data science (and more).

Udemy courses can actually be created by anyone, so they don’t necessarily represent the ‘standard’ in any particular topic. Each course has a list of reviews from actual users, so you can judge whether the course is right for you or not. I’d recommend checking out the reviews before you start one!

4. Free Code Camp

Another free coding boot camp, Free Code Camp has a wide and established curriculum to teach from. All of the projects available allow users to work with hands on experience. What I love about this coding resource is the community behind it. There are millions of other users willing to support and help each other which is lovely to see in this day and age.

Free Code Camp doesn’t just teach you coding languages. It offers a lot more, such as being able to apply said coding to real world scenarios. You can build projects and take part in them with others as well as getting a certification at the end of it.

For example, they will actually prepare you for your developer job interview! How cool is that? Free Code Camp is a non profit organisation offering accessible coding to anyone.

YouTube Channels

5. DevTips

DevTips is one of Travis Neilson’s YouTube channels, who specialises in ‘making things for human people’. The YouTube channel focuses on web design and web development and sometimes offers live Q & As.

DevTips provides weekly shows for those that want to be inspired. The channel opens up opportunities for people to learn development and programming together. Watchers can get involved during the shows, creating a community aspect on a weekly basis. Shows start at 8:00 PM (GMT) every Friday.

6. Coder’s Guide

YouTube channel Coder’s Guide provides a video series on coding languages like JavaScript, HTML and CSS. You’ll find a range of videos from quick learning to in-depth courses, job interview preparation and more.

Neil Rowe offers up some easy to follow video tutorials for anyone wanting to learn coding and web development. He shows you step by step what to do and how to do it. What’s nice is that Neil himself will respond to comments on his videos, answer questions, and get involved in conversations.

7. LearnCode.academy

LearnCode.academy’s YouTube channel is regularly updated. As well as offering free coding videos to help you learn, they also provide tips and tricks to making the best website.

The YouTube channel covers web development tutorials, web design tutorials and more. Some of the languages that are covered are HTML, CSS, JavaScript, CSS Layouts, Responsive Design, and React.js.

HTML & CSS

8. Learn CSS Layout

Learn CSS Layout is ideal if you know the basics of HTML and CSS to begin with. If you don’t have the basic knowledge, you can use some of the other resources I’ve mentioned in this guide to get you started.

It will teach you the best ways and fundamentals of setting up a website in terms of layout. This is going to be valuable know-how when you start creating your own website, and useful for ensuring your site is mobile-friendly.

9. Mozilla Developer Network

The Mozilla Developer Network provides free HTML and CSS documentation to anyone and everyone. They provide tutorials for a selection of topics, from beginner to expert skill levels.

The idea behind the Mozilla Developer Network is to provide articles about Mozilla code. Whether you want to download it or build it, you’ll need to know how the code works. Topics also cover add-ons for Mozilla apps.

10. HTML Dog

HTML dog has some great beginner HTML tutorials (like this one). They also cover CSS tutorials and appeal to beginners and advanced users alike.

HTML dog is a useful resource for anything HTML, CSS, or JavaScript. These languages cover the basics of web development and web design and provide a useful stepping stone into the world of development and programming.

Git

11. Try Git

Created by Code School, Try Git pretty much does what it says on the tin. You can try out your Git knowledge (if you have prior experience) or simply experiment with Git.

12. Git Immersion

This is the place to go if you’ve never used Git before. Git Immersion offers its users a guided tour into the world of Git, setting you up with the basic knowledge.

Coding Blogs

13. Tuts+

Tuts+ offers loads of coding tutorials which can be pretty helpful if you’re looking for something specific. They do have courses too, but these are paid for.

Tuts+ has over 1200 video courses, 250 eBooks, and almost 30,000 tutorials. You can use your newly founded knowledge and skills and make use of Envato Elements. Here you’ll have access to thousands of website templates and themes, designs, and almost half a million photos.

14. David Walsh

David Walsh is a senior developer at Mozilla. His blog (with other contributors aside from himself) offers demos, tutorials, and how-to guides.

David’s blog covers popular topics including .htaccess, CSS, WordPress, SEO, JavaScript, HTML5, and lots more. His blog offers news related to the web development world, alongside incredible demos and feature discussions.

15. CSS Tricks

There’s a whole bunch of stuff on CSS on the CSS Tricks blog. They’ve got loads of resources as well as covering other subjects like JavaScript and PHP. When owner, Chris, started the blog in 2007, he was mostly writing about CSS. It occurred to him that HTML and JavaScript were being mentioned a lot as they both form the basis of creating websites.

Because the blog was made on WordPress, Chris found himself talking about WordPress too, so the name quickly became desolate as he now covers a large range of topics.

CSS-Tricks mainly focuses on building websites and everything else that goes with it. The blog have permanent staff writers as well as guest authors who all offer a different perspective within their content.

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